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Erin
06-12-2011, 07:12 AM
We have waves from time to time where threads from years ago get bumped because somebody finds one in a search or something and doesn't notice the date. We're having one now, and it's inspired me to finally ask about this!

I've thought about this several times, and I keep coming back to a conundrum. We want members to use the search function instead of starting new threads for things, but what if they do find an old thread that kinda-sorta answers their question, but they have a new take on it or new information. Is it really better for them to start a whole new topic for that, when the older thread can just be bumped and added to? To me, it seems way more logical to bump the old thread so people can see what has been discussed before, and not keep re-inventing the wheel and re-hashing over and over.

For example, the old threads about casting customs. Those were SO great and informative, and some amazing posts were made by people that don't really frequent Blab anymore. Is there really anything wrong with bumping those when the issue comes up again, so the people involved today can see some of the well put posts on it? Yes, you can just link to it, but posting to it bumps it for everybody to see in new posts, as well as giving the opportunity to expound on the old discussion on the same thread.

I don't think it needs to be a regular occurrence, or that people should necessarily be encouraged to bump old threads, but I also think that maybe we should let it slide more when old threads get bumped for a legit reason, rather than just adding chit-chat.

What do you guys think?

muggyscugglemeyer
06-12-2011, 07:18 AM
I have been a total Search Failure with the new feature, so I can understand someone not being able to find what they're looking for. I kinda like seeing old threads pop up again. Alot of them are new to me.

Stacy
06-12-2011, 07:39 AM
I like seeing them brought up if its relevant. We keep threads for a reason, and often they can encourage new discussion. I for one was thrilled to see the 5 year old collectibility thread get necro-ed. Good info there with interesting opinions.

Sometimes its annoying if there's nothing relevant to add, but I don't mind it much :)

bronzino
06-12-2011, 07:42 AM
IME, most of the time what is happening is that the new member is not aware that s/he is responding to a thread that is 4-5 years old. The new member doesn't necessarily have a keen interest in the subject; she's just commenting for the same reason all of us do. She has time on her hands. :)

So my solution is just to direct them to the date and tell them the thread is 4-5 years old. Usually that stops it immediately.

It's been very rare that the new member says "hey I wanted to know about that." If they do, I just tell them to start a new thread, linking the old one and indicating a desire to continue the convo. Then everybody can reference the old thread if they desire, but there's no confusion about the age of the remarks in it.

When you revive a thread that is 4-5 year old, it often produces a series of posts where people are reminding each other that the thread is that old. Once you get beyond the last "old" page, it's no longer evident that the thread is old. So you have new participants asking old ones to elaborate, when the old participants may not even be around anymore. Better to handle it as I've suggested so you don't have all the confusion.

Amy
06-12-2011, 09:52 AM
IME, most of the time what is happening is that the new member is not aware that s/he is responding to a thread that is 4-5 years old. The new member doesn't necessarily have a keen interest in the subject; she's just commenting for the same reason all of us do. She has time on her hands. :)

So my solution is just to direct them to the date and tell them the thread is 4-5 years old. Usually that stops it immediately.

It's been very rare that the new member says "hey I wanted to know about that." If they do, I just tell them to start a new thread, linking the old one and indicating a desire to continue the convo. Then everybody can reference the old thread if they desire, but there's no confusion about the age of the remarks in it.

When you revive a thread that is 4-5 year old, it often produces a series of posts where people are reminding each other that the thread is that old. Once you get beyond the last "old" page, it's no longer evident that the thread is old. So you have new participants asking old ones to elaborate, when the old participants may not even be around anymore. Better to handle it as I've suggested so you don't have all the confusion.

:yeahthat

There are some threads that pop up that I'm excited to see again, or ones that are interesting but haven't seen. It's kind of a bummer to find out it's really old, but I somewhow expect to find a good reason that it was resurrected (sp?). But like bronzino said, it's usually a disappointing random comment added to it. :rolleyes

Mary
06-12-2011, 10:48 PM
IME, most of the time what is happening is that the new member is not aware that s/he is responding to a thread that is 4-5 years old. The new member doesn't necessarily have a keen interest in the subject; she's just commenting for the same reason all of us do. She has time on her hands. :)

So my solution is just to direct them to the date and tell them the thread is 4-5 years old. Usually that stops it immediately.

It's been very rare that the new member says "hey I wanted to know about that." If they do, I just tell them to start a new thread, linking the old one and indicating a desire to continue the convo. Then everybody can reference the old thread if they desire, but there's no confusion about the age of the remarks in it.

When you revive a thread that is 4-5 year old, it often produces a series of posts where people are reminding each other that the thread is that old. Once you get beyond the last "old" page, it's no longer evident that the thread is old. So you have new participants asking old ones to elaborate, when the old participants may not even be around anymore. Better to handle it as I've suggested so you don't have all the confusion.I second Amy's :yeahthat

It's not practical for mods to find and close all threads that have not had any activity in, say, a year, to forestall this happening. Perhaps someday it will be possible to automatically close threads once there have been no posts in a certain amount of time.

SubaruWolf
06-12-2011, 10:53 PM
I enjoy seeing them resurrected. Frequently, they're threads I hadn't seen before but when they are, I find that I really enjoy going through and re-reading or at least skimming them for the best parts (or pictures!).

I also really appreciate a forum where members aren't bonked over the head and shouted at for zombifying threads. I did this a couple times on a different forum and was rudely informed that my actions were not appreciated. I hadn't realized what I'd been doing and felt shamed and disgruntled after being corrected.

Tifns
06-12-2011, 11:24 PM
AW I got excited thought we were gonna talk about zombies again....

Threnody
07-03-2011, 11:31 PM
^ Lol same here. I've got The Zombie Survival Guide ready for such an occasion too!

unicornwoman
07-07-2011, 04:34 AM
If you can't reopen old threads when it is appropriate, it seems to defeat the part of the purpose of keeping them around.

groteske
07-07-2011, 05:45 AM
Coming from another, much older forum where some threads date back to 1997, contain hundreds of 50-post pages, and are still being replied to regularly.. I support the administration on this one.

Relative information can always be linked.