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JamieD
11-24-2015, 04:22 PM
This email was in my spam folder:

"PayPal Security <cust@reports.com> Nov 23 at 10:33 PM
Message body
Dear Valued Client

Please take a few minutes out of your online experience to know why we have limited the access (temporarily) to your account.

In a continuing effort to provide our users with state-of-the-art security, we limit accounts that may be in threat.

We have sent you this notification hoping that you would provide some information with us; thus verifying that you are the legitimate account holder.
PayPal have provided a form (see attachment) to verify your account. You may download and fill in the form.

Our security team will immediately review the information you have provided, and your account should be restored back to normal.

We apologize for the inconvenience this may have caused. We hope this issue gets resol"


I forwarded it to spoof@PayPal.com and yup...you guessed it...NOT from PayPal. If you get this email or one similar forward them to PayPal. It helps them squash this kind of :bs

It also had an attachment with the email.

Just wanted to give folks a heads up.

JamieD

Brenda
11-24-2015, 04:29 PM
Thank you, Jami. Don't they usually address you by name when PayPal emails you? And the bad grammar is a pretty good indication it's not legit. :haha

Can I have your Sam I Am? :D

JoeCool
11-24-2015, 05:05 PM
this one has been doing the rounds in Australia for the past year. whoever it is keeps sending it to me and I just keep on deleting it. I don't even bother to chase up the real paypal to report a scam, they never do anything about it. the minute it says 'valued client' not to mention looking at the email address it was sent from (which is never genuine and can be spotted straight away) - those 2 things are a dead giveaway that it's a scam.

VWK'sanEasyGoer
11-24-2015, 05:08 PM
I got this last year or the year before and forwarded it on as well to the Paypal spoof email. Any legitimate Paypal request would never ask for any kind of verification on line.

I've gotten these from other companies too in my work email. Uggg.

JamieD
11-24-2015, 05:14 PM
Can I have your Sam I Am? :D

Short answer...No. :) I :adore my Sam I Am. One...I purchased him from the JAH... have been his one and only owner. Two...Sam is the nickname my Dad used to call me.

I think he's going to the grave with me. :lol

On the PayPal scam...I haven't gotten one for quite a few years. I was sorta surprised to see one. But then again...I guess those scammers never quit. :( :yuk

JamieD

Mary
11-24-2015, 08:16 PM
There are similar emails going around for "your court date" and "your IRS refund", among other things. I've gotten both. Of course the idea is to create some alarm as the recipient had no idea about this court date, or refund, or Paypal issue. But such information would never be sent by email unless the recipient set up the email exchange in the first place.

I've also gotten that Paypal "alert" as well as one claiming "we've restricted access to your account", again hoping to create enough alarm that the recipient will respond.

In general, if you had no idea you had a problem with Paypal, the IRS, the courts, etc. ... you probably don't. :)

Brenda
11-24-2015, 08:18 PM
Short answer...No. :) I :adore my Sam I Am. One...I purchased him from the JAH... have been his one and only owner. Two...Sam is the nickname my Dad used to call me.

I think he's going to the grave with me. :lol

On the PayPal scam...I haven't gotten one for quite a few years. I was sorta surprised to see one. But then again...I guess those scammers never quit. :( :yuk

JamieD


:haha. A girl's gotta try, doesn't she?

i never read PP emails anyway, even the ones reminding me my credit payment is due soon. Those ones sit in my inbox as a reminder to pay and any others get deleted.

Mary
11-24-2015, 08:19 PM
...
On the PayPal scam...I haven't gotten one for quite a few years. I was sorta surprised to see one. But then again...I guess those scammers never quit. :( :yuk

JamieD

I think also that over the years a whole new group of young adults come of age that perhaps haven't yet seen these things, so they are fresh meat, as it were. :yuk So the same scam is rehashed, and might as well send to the old addresses as well. That's my guess.

I remember when I was a young adult just out of the parent's house, I was shocked and amazed at the new scams ... only to find out they were old scams. Just new to me. :toothy

Brenda
11-24-2015, 08:22 PM
My mom gets a lot of phone scams and I'm always concerned she'll fall for one because she's 80 and not always on the ball, but she's a smart cookie and always asks the caller to send her something in the mail or she'll tell them to keep the cruise to the Bahamas for themselves but usually she just hangs up.

Mary
11-24-2015, 08:39 PM
My mom gets a lot of phone scams and I'm always concerned she'll fall for one because she's 80 and not always on the ball, but she's a smart cookie and always asks the caller to send her something in the mail or she'll tell them to keep the cruise to the Bahamas for themselves but usually she just hangs up.

My parents fell for a phone scam a few years ago. They are both college educated and skeptical, and were sure they would never get caught up in something like that. But they also proved to be fairly unsophisticated about the red flags that were obvious to the rest of us. The scammer convinced them that he was one of their grandsons, and also not to tell anyone about it while it was going on.

So ... I think there is something to be concerned about. All I know to do is to stay in touch and keep reminder her that if anyone tells her not to tell anyone else about anything at all, even someone she thinks is a friend or a relative, she should definitely tell you, regardless. :yes

Brenda
11-24-2015, 08:51 PM
Yeah, whenever the news does a story about a scam I use it as an opportunity to ensure she doesn't fall for it. Recently an older couple in our city fell for the grandson in jail scam and lost, what, $3,000 I think. Fortunately, neither my brother nor I have kids so I know that wouldn't work and odds are highly unlikely my brother would call her for bail money. When he was in a motorcycle accident last year and was arrested, we didn't even know until he got home. Anyway, I told my mom that the only reason a grandson should be calling his grandparents for bail money is if they're the ones who raised him and he has nowhere else to go. Oddly enough, you don't hear of granddaughter in jail and needing bail money. I think I've heard it once or twice but not as frequently as the grandson.

Beethovens7th
11-25-2015, 05:20 AM
Short answer...No. :) I :adore my Sam I Am. One...I purchased him from the JAH... have been his one and only owner. Two...Sam is the nickname my Dad used to call me.

I think he's going to the grave with me. :lol

On the PayPal scam...I haven't gotten one for quite a few years. I was sorta surprised to see one. But then again...I guess those scammers never quit. :( :yuk

JamieD

i, too, love this horse, Sam I Am!! AND, my mom nicknamed me "Sam"! :lol How about that?? :) :)

Salem
11-25-2015, 07:52 AM
Right now there's a scam going around here where someone pretends to be from a utility company and threatens to shut off your service if you don't pay money you allegedly owe. I'm sure they are getting a lot of older people with this one, as well as others who are really disorganized about keeping up with their bills.

My mother got scammed by a man who told her she had a sick tree, then charged her a fortune to cut it down and take the wood for himself. He had no tree-cutting business and no insurance, and the tree was huge and right next to her house, so this could have been even worse than it was. There was nothing wrong with the tree, and it was the only one providing shade in her yard. Older people are easy targets, especially for those seeking charity. My mother thinks that every piece of junk mail is a bill she needs to pay, especially if it has one of those slips with "recommended contribution" and a dollar amount on it. She complains all of the time that no matter how much she sends to these people, they won't leave her alone. I just can't get her to understand how it works. Remember to watch out for the older people in your family.

JamieD
11-25-2015, 10:13 AM
i, too, love this horse, Sam I Am!! AND, my mom nicknamed me "Sam"! :lol How about that?? :) :)

We're twins!! :) :lol


Also got a phone scam yesterday. Something about calling about my criminal trial...:wtf I'm reasonably sure that if I was in a criminal trial that I would already know about it. :lol

I just put the phone on speaker and just set it down and let them ramble on...:blahblah

Scammers...UGH!!! :yuk

JamieD

Beethovens7th
11-25-2015, 10:21 AM
We're twins!! :) :lol


Also got a phone scam yesterday. Something about calling about my criminal trial...:wtf I'm reasonably sure that if I was in a criminal trial that I would already know about it. :lol

I just put the phone on speaker and just set it down and let them ramble on...:blahblah

Scammers...UGH!!! :yuk

JamieD

:hugg Hugging my twin! :)

i keep getting calls from Phoenix Arizona! It rings twice and nothing...

SeaWatch
11-25-2015, 10:23 AM
I think also that over the years a whole new group of young adults come of age that perhaps haven't yet seen these things, so they are fresh meat, as it were. :yuk So the same scam is rehashed, and might as well send to the old addresses as well. That's my guess.

I remember when I was a young adult just out of the parent's house, I was shocked and amazed at the new scams ... only to find out they were old scams. Just new to me. :toothy

Very true -- These old scams continually reappear, and make the rounds over and over again. It happens frequently during holiday times (like now), and during the months when people file their income taxes.

Paypal will never address an email as "Dear Valued Client". They will always use your actual full name (or professional business name) as it appears on your account. The IRS will never send you an email, or call you on the phone, for requesting money, etc., as they will always do it by snail mail.

I've received tons of these scam emails over the years, and I just recently got that same Paypal email. The funny thing is that it came to one of my email accounts that has no connection to my Paypal account whatsoever. In fact, that happens frequently. A few weeks ago I got an email from the Apple iTunes store regarding something to do with my account, but that was also sent to one of my email accounts that has no affiliation with my iTunes account.

Scammers will continue to scam, and spam, as long they keep finding suckers to fall for their scams. It's a sad, sad, world. :( The worst part is that most of their victims are the elderly.

Mary
11-26-2015, 12:04 PM
Yeah, those emails ... if the issues is news to me, it's not something I'm likely to hear for the first time by email. :)



Yeah, whenever the news does a story about a scam I use it as an opportunity to ensure she doesn't fall for it. Recently an older couple in our city fell for the grandson in jail scam and lost, what, $3,000 I think. Fortunately, neither my brother nor I have kids so I know that wouldn't work and odds are highly unlikely my brother would call her for bail money. When he was in a motorcycle accident last year and was arrested, we didn't even know until he got home. Anyway, I told my mom that the only reason a grandson should be calling his grandparents for bail money is if they're the ones who raised him and he has nowhere else to go. Oddly enough, you don't hear of granddaughter in jail and needing bail money. I think I've heard it once or twice but not as frequently as the grandson.

That was the one that got my elderly parents - grandson in jail, in Mexico. That does happen to over-enthusiastic partying young people in Texas, sometimes. Several thousand dollars. And as said, none of us thought they would fall for anything like that. I was completely disconcerted they didn't tell me about it, as I spoke with them frequently by phone. But they fell for the "please don't tell anyone!", and their hearing is so bad they didn't realize it wasn't him. All they had to do was phone HIM on his cell to find out it wasn't so - they never thought of it. The whole scenario was so preposterous it had to be true, I think. The scammers knew a lot of detailed information about the family and grandchildren that made it sound real to my parents. They knew the boy's father (my brother) was unreachable out of the country on business (he goes way into the farming hinterland on travel, no cell.) Got all the info off social media, especially Facebook. :dohdoh