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View Full Version : Am I a complete A$$hole? Or has the world changed?



paleogirl78
12-05-2016, 08:54 PM
Am I an a$@hole? This is seriously the question I'm asking myself right now.

I have an ad up on a model for sale. It's been up a while and I've sold others, so I'm not hurting for money.

In my ad it states I prefer PayPal only but will accept other forms of payment as long as the buyer realizes I will hold the model until it clears. This is for ANY other type of payment.

I had a person contact me wanting to know about a money order. I said sure, BUT with a hold until it clears and asked for references as I don't know her and have NEVER done business with her before. Her name didn't have any results I could find on anyof the reference pages.

Flash forward to an offended email (politely though) about how I shouldn't need references for a postal money order. Needless to say, I once again, explained my policies. I was very polite, but explained that I have been ripped off before. I declined to do the transaction because though I offered my references (which is only fair), she declined to at all. I didn't feel confortable. I was then informed that I'm losing the sale and that a postal money order is good cash. I should ship the same day the letter arrived.

Now, here's why I want to know if I'm just being a jerk.

A few years ago, I was ripped off with a FAKE postal money order. My bank didn't catch it for a week. By the time the damage was done(thanks also to my ex husband who contributed with money issues), I was out about $2000 in bank fees and the bounced checks. I really don't want to experience anything like this again. It took years to recover from it and caused issues for me to even keep my bank account with the check alert systems.

I won't go back to that again, as I've learned that a person can't trust even a postal money order.

Am I being unreasonable? Should I have just shut up and gone through with it? I did inform the prospective buyer that the hold was only if their form of payment was held for some reason not by me. If it was good, it would ship right away. I was told I'm certainly distrustful and I shouldn't worry about it happening until it does. But it has, just not with this person.

Is this ok? Is it normal now for a buyer to tell the seller how to change their terms? Am I at fault here for being too overly cautious?

What should I have done? How could I have handled this better?

Linnie Bowen

VWK'sanEasyGoer
12-05-2016, 09:01 PM
I feel you totally did the right thing. I wouldn't lose a wink of sleep over it. You stated your policies, the buyer didn't like them, too bad for them. Your policies are quite normal to me and not at all unreasonable.

I would not think you're being an a**hole or a jerk one bit :hugg

champagnehorses
12-05-2016, 09:17 PM
If you didn't feel comfortable with the transaction, then I see no problem with declining to sell. :hugg

paleogirl78
12-05-2016, 09:32 PM
Thank you, both of you.

This has seriously been going on for a couple of days and I have been agonizing over it.

I try to be completely fair! And do it politely too. But this is one of those times that I want to just tear my hair out :(

I don't know if she's a member here or not so I completely tried to be as vague as possible and no naming names. I did ask if the person was, but was declined an answer when I was asking about references.

summerwinds
12-05-2016, 09:33 PM
I wouldn't give this a second thought. My seller's policy is that I only accept PayPal as payment and nothing else, which I state in every ad. I have had several inquires that want to pay with money order and I politely inform them I am happy to sell the model but only if they pay with PayPal. If they get upset, the sale is off. There will always be another buyer if I wait long enough and it will be less hassle for me.

paleogirl78
12-05-2016, 09:39 PM
I wouldn't give this a second thought. My seller's policy is that I only accept PayPal as payment and nothing else, which I state in every ad. I have had several inquires that want to pay with money order and I politely inform them I am happy to sell the model but only if they pay with PayPal. If they get upset, the sale is off. There will always be another buyer if I wait long enough and it will be less hassle for me.

Thank you! I'm so glad to find out I'm not the only one being that cautious!

emt8134
12-05-2016, 09:40 PM
Your horse, your practices. No one has a say but you. Fyi you made me snort my pop with that thread title...:lmao

juliacodeman
12-05-2016, 09:52 PM
I love the thread title, ha! That's great. Absolutely, the horse goes nowhere, until the money order clears. I too have had someone send me a fake money order, and the ink rubbed off in my hand-you could totally tell it was fake! I couldn't believe it. No way would I ship same day. I sent a check to a seller clear across the country and fully expect her to hold my horses for 7-10 days if that's what it takes for the bank to clear my check. I would absolutely not give this a second thought, you did the right thing-and if someone gets mad about it, well, that makes me even more suspicious of them!

pipperroo
12-05-2016, 10:09 PM
Nope, Nope, Nope!

You're the seller; you make the rules. If I as the buyer don't like the rules, I am free to purchase elsewhere.

The spread of fake money orders is rampant. I would not treat one as "cash" anymore as they were treated in the past.

My BIL almost lost thousands with one of the Nigerian scheme fake money orders, the one where they overpay you with a money order and you use Western Union to send the overpayment back. Thank goodness he waited until he found out the money order was fake.

-----------------
Jan Pletsch

Kim G
12-06-2016, 12:29 AM
I also have the same policy about money orders, as I have had friends that had issues with fake money orders as well. I don't want to risk the same issues, and if they really want something fast, then there is always Paypal. Get some sleep :-)

ALemon
12-06-2016, 12:40 AM
Not an A$$hole. It's hard to trust anyone these days, let alone someone ( or name ) your not familiar with.

Brenda
12-06-2016, 12:43 AM
Even before I read the entire post I was thinking it had to be a rhetorical question because I have seen countless ads state that if anything other than PayPal is used, the model (or item being sold) will not ship until payment clears. When you have prior bad experiences, you are smart to keep to stricter practices. For the most part, yes, money orders are as good as cash, however, I worked in an industry where it became obvious how easily they can be altered or forged...even the so-called 'safe' postal ones. You asked for references and she chose to not provide them. You got a hinkie feeling about the transaction, and from some of her behavior I can't exactly blame you, so chose to cancel it. I think you were smart to protect your ass-ets. ;). Seriously, though, I think you did the right thing and if she was on the up and up, she would've understood your request for references. If she had none, that would've been easy enough to relay to you.

horsefreak
12-06-2016, 09:37 AM
:hugg You're not an A$$hole. I think you handled it the right way. I agree w/ Julia, if someone gets mad, it makes me more suspicious.

RockyMountainBreyer
12-06-2016, 09:39 AM
That's not unfair in any way shape or form.

I purchased around $1300 worth of horses over the past few months. I know, splurged. But I as a serious or even interested buyer look at the seller, and their policies. I would state that I understand waiting for a money order to clear as long as they stayed in contact. I've yet to have an issue and would happily purchase from them again. I think the sellers policy is always reasonable. It keeps everyone safe!

;9't loose sleep, if the buyer doesn't have the courtesy to respect something that small who knows what all issues could pop up down the road.

curlinfan
12-06-2016, 10:14 AM
I don't have a paypal account and I don't plan on opening one. When I buy or sell online I use/accept personal checks and postal money orders. I won't accept MO's from a bank. Only postal money orders. When someone sends me a MO I take it and the model to the post office. They're able to tell right away if it's fake. If the MO is legit I have them take the cost of mailing the model out of it then get cash for the rest. Never had a problem doing it this way. Personal checks have to clear before I ship model.
I don't think you were unreasonable. You stated your policy and stuck to it. I wouldn't have had a problem with it. Some people are just too thin-skinned. Their problem, not yours.

jettabar99
12-06-2016, 10:17 AM
Given the limited information i cannot say with no doubt you are not an a$@hole :roflmao:roflmao:roflmao:roflmao

however you definitely did the right thing in this case!

paleogirl78
12-06-2016, 11:36 AM
I don't have a paypal account and I don't plan on opening one. When I buy or sell online I use/accept personal checks and postal money orders. I won't accept MO's from a bank. Only postal money orders. When someone sends me a MO I take it and the model to the post office. They're able to tell right away if it's fake. If the MO is legit I have them take the cost of mailing the model out of it then get cash for the rest. Never had a problem doing it this way. Personal checks have to clear before I ship model.
I don't think you were unreasonable. You stated your policy and stuck to it. I wouldn't have had a problem with it. Some people are just too thin-skinned. Their problem, not yours.

This is what I was wondering mostly here. If they are able to tell right away if it's fake or legit. The incident I mentioned happened several years ago when these fake ones started showing up. This was also during the time of the aforementioned Nigeria scams. Yup, ex-hubby was sucked into that too. So I'm VERY skittish.

I totally understand that not everyone has PayPal. That's no big deal. And I expect the same sort of treatment if I pay with anything other than PayPal myself. I've just started using PayPal for everything anymore. Heck, even Dollar General takes it now! I just feel better if I'm not letting my real bank account card numbers be out there all over the place and limiting the funds on it so it can't just run off. That and the dispute section if I ever need it. Hasn't happened yet but someday it might.

I've had a couple people purchase from me recently and even pay something off ahead of time on time payments. Then they were kind enough to work with me on the holiday and around three sick kids to get to the post office. There are so many nice and understanding people I deal with. Many have been people I've never dealt with before.

It was just seriously driving me nuts about this set of emails though.

I'm thinking I'll redo my 'policies' once again on mhsp. I had thought I was pretty blunt and clear, it maybe I need to tweak it some. I know I can't be the only one asking for references though!

paleogirl78
12-06-2016, 11:43 AM
Given the limited information i cannot say with no doubt you are not an a$@hole :roflmao:roflmao:roflmao:roflmao

however you definitely did the right thing in this case!

Ha! Last week I was texting my brother. We don't have a close relationship really. He stopped replying cold turkey. My SO informed me I'm rather a jerk to him. He just showed up here a few minutes ago to help build rooms in the basement. I did apologize on Saturday, BUT he says he had no clue what I was saying because it was his SO replying on his phone. So apparently, on occasion, I AM!! Which is mainly why I wondered if maybe I was being too paranoid about this potential sale.

So, to answer that, I AM an A@@hole by my own admission. I just don't sugar coat anything.

FourWindsFarm
12-06-2016, 11:43 AM
If your buyer was so upset about waiting a few days for it to clear, I think you were right to call off the sale and follow your gut. Your sale, your rules.

Aidan's Toy Trove
12-06-2016, 11:44 AM
Your terms seem perfectly reasonable to me. You can't make everyone happy!

Eviejean
12-06-2016, 08:52 PM
As others have mentioned - You ABSOLUTELY did nothing wrong - besides the fact: your sale, your rules.

I think the thing(s) that bothered me most were:
1. the buyer declined to give you references when they were trying to purchase from you
2. they got angry that you were trying to protect yourself and
3. they were trying to change the stated terms of your sale.

Do not lose sleep over not doing business with them!

On a side note:
If I'm looking into buying a model, I ALWAYS give my references to the seller UP FRONT, when I inquire about the model.
I believe this shows I'm serious about the purchase. For a potential buyer to decline to give references really sets off the warning bells, IMHO.

Mary
12-06-2016, 10:18 PM
I chime in as well ... no need to be worried at all over this potential buyer's behavior. I would see it as just that: behavior. And *not* a true transaction issue.

I don't think that any one person's reaction to your policies is a reason to re-do those policies if they are understood by others and working well. This just wasn't your kind of buyer, and that's ok. If you deal with enough people you will deal with a few who are just ... well, better off buying from someone else. :) ;)

After years upon years of reading TTB, I think anyone would agree that the best practice is to (a) have policies and (b) stick to them. That's the best way of protecting yourself. You owe nothing more to anyone else.

Something I see as a red flag in a transaction is a party who pushes to have the normal policies waived. Another red flag is an urgency to rush the transaction through such that the policies can't be followed in that amount of time. Those things might not indicate any sinister intent, but it leaves the door wide open for a bad experience.

Also ... I agree with your policies. If you want to have money orders checked at the bank that is nice of you, but if it isn't convenient, you can wait for it to clear. Although a money order or a cashier's check or even an echeck are considered by many to be 'as good as cash', in truth there is *no* guarantee. There are various ways to present them with chicanery in the process. The bank will make the deposit and credit funds, but then later *reverse* those funds when they find the problem. The bank won't bear the loss, rather, whoever accepted the wonky money order or wonky cashier's check will bear the loss. So those "not until it clears" policies are right on. :)

LadyPhaseCrazy
12-07-2016, 11:57 AM
:yeahthat :thumbsup :yes

paleogirl78
12-07-2016, 10:54 PM
Thank you Mary. I was hoping some long term eyes on this kind of thing would chime in.

This is now one less thing I'll be stressing over.

Now, its on to the step dad's surgery I'm driving him and mom to tomorrow morning.

It never ends!

Lupineleigh
12-07-2016, 11:32 PM
I think you were right to sick with your gut and policy, too. In the past it used to be hard to pay for stuff online. When I was a teenager, all I had was a savings account and my piggie bank. I did not have a credit card or checking account. I was already driving then so rather than ask Mom to pay for my online purchase, I drove to the post office and got my first money order and mailed it right away. No problem'o. I had no problem with waiting several weeks since I figured it would take about a week for the seller to get my money order, and another week for it to clear the bank. It took about a month of nerve-wracking waiting, but I got my model (albeit in worse condition than I expected from the listing, but a horse in hand was better than nothing. The seller got mad at me for questioning the condition of the items though.) I understand how nerve wracking it can be to be a buyer with no references and no checking account, but nowadays it is easier to remove stored information from Paypal if you don't want to keep a card on there than it is to try to get by with just cash. Paypal has a lot staked on their reputation as a secure transaction website. I'd rather trust them than the mail nowadays... But I am getting off topic.
I think, if the buyer was unable to provide references, she should have been upfront rather than evasive or defensive. The defensiveness and passive aggressive remark about you being distrustful sets off alarm bells for me, too. If you're a blankety blank for being self preserving, then I guess I am, too. You're in good company. :lol

RobinHoodFan
12-08-2016, 10:33 AM
Nah, I don't think you did anything wrong. First, in this day and age, there really isn't a reason not to pay with paypal or credit card if you're surfing the internet buying. Way more secure than sending something in the mail or over the phone.

But that's not really the point...if they choose MO then thats their choice and should follow seller terms regarding MO payments. Yes, POSTAL money orders are CLOSE to cash and aren't easily be forged--but they can be. (I wouldn't accept any MO's that are not from USPS for forgery reasons as well as quickness of clearing reasons. I THINK, but don't quote me, PO money orders do clear quicker than others like walmart, etc.).

If I accept MO's, 1) they must be USPS money orders, 2)I strongly reccomend them to be sent with tracking for BUYER security--their risk if they dont and it gets lost, and 3) I also wait for MO's to clear before shipping. It's usually quicker than a check, yes, but still usually 1-2 business days. It's NOT the same as cash. At least not at my bank or maybe because I have a business account? It's rare I get MOs but had one recently and I asked the woman at the bank if it clears right away and if I'm safe to ship and she told me no, it takes 1-2 bus days.

So yes, MOs still need clearing in some, if not all, banks. They can wait a day or two longer to get their item while you wait for your payment for said item to clear and be valid...it's the least they can do to for the seller given they are using an unpreffered method of payment and are already having exceptions made for them.

I think the buyer was a bit more rude than the seller here IMHO. If I were the buyer and have nothing to hide, then I would want the seller to feel comfortable selling to me too and would TOTALLy oblige to 1-2 day clearance. It's either they do have something to hide or they're just being a pain because they can never be made happy and always want things their way and NOW. If they act this way for standard terms of payment, how would they act if something went wrong? I say you made the right choice. If they didn't feel comfortable with that they should have just said, "OK, I understand but I'll have to pass". The red flag for me started when the buyer began to push the your buttons to see which they can get to work for themselves--mainly the guilt button. So yea, I wouldn't think more of it. You're did fine ;)

QUESTION....was your forged money order that you had, an actual POSTAL MO...like from USPS? Those are supposed to be the safest and hardest to forge...and if it were a forged USPS MO, I hope you reported it because it's a Federal crime to do that and the government wouldn't be too happy about it and certainly go after the forger.

For future reference (and I too just noticing this now!) USPS shows you how to distinguish between a real and fake MO here (just click on "show details" under accepting MOs. Also shows you where to report the fraud: https://www.usps.com/shop/money-orders.htm
You can also check the status of a MO using the verifiaction code on them here. If it doesn't show up..then it's probably fake: https://mois.usps.com/pls/pmoisnp/mois_external_pkg.main

Angiet
12-08-2016, 02:15 PM
I am glad to read about all this advice. I didn't figure that PO money orders could be faked and that they needed time to clear. I guess I was a bit naive.

Anyway, when I get a PO money order, I usually take it to the Post Office and cash it there, then use the money to ship the horse. I have to go to the PO anyway and there is no wait time for it to clear. That has always worked for me.

Mary
12-10-2016, 10:47 PM
Most people understand that a check can bounce, and needs time to clear and prove out to be good through the banking system.

Many people do not realize that the following all have the potential *not* to clear - to come up insufficient/no funds (*even* after a bank has credited funds - they will reverse *later* if it doesn't clear):

money orders from any source; cashier's checks; echecks; any form of payment other than cash.

In addition to the risk of forgery, there are ways to trick the issuer into thinking they are issuing against good funds, when in fact they are not. Unlike with credit cards, banks and other financial institutions do NOT absorb the loss on these instruments. Whoever accepted and deposited them absorbs the loss.


The very best thing anyone can do to protect themselves is to accept Paypal, credit card or bank transfer funds, only. Most of us aren't up to dealing with credit cards and bank transfers (although that is a fairly easy payment method if your bank offers it). Paypal is well worth the fees for the protection it offers, IMO. :)

Waiting for clearance just part of accepting those payments to help buyers who don't use Paypal. If a buyer does not want to wait, the answer is that they use a Paypal account instead. That's IMO. :yes

RobinHoodFan
12-10-2016, 11:55 PM
Most of us aren't up to dealing with credit cards and bank transfers (although that is a fairly easy payment method if your bank offers it). Paypal is well worth the fees for the protection it offers, IMO. :)


You can actually easily accept credit cards through paypal on your free account. You send an invoice and when they go tot pay they have the option of signing in with paypal or using a credit card if they don't have a paypal account. Easy, peasy.

Square is also another free service (aside from your normal transaction fees which are comparable to paypal) you can use to accept credit cards...even enter them in manually or swipe them like if you're at a fair. So not much more to deal with by accepting CC's these days either.

dapple
12-11-2016, 09:36 AM
Except when square doesn't work. Recently a vendor spent ten minutes trying to log in for a sale but was getting nowhere. I think she was more upset than I, she ended up accepting a check.

RobinHoodFan
12-11-2016, 04:52 PM
Except when square doesn't work. Recently a vendor spent ten minutes trying to log in for a sale but was getting nowhere. I think she was more upset than I, she ended up accepting a check.

I don't think that would really have to do with square though, would it? Did it say the reason it wasn't letting them log-in? Did they not remember their password or were typing it wrong? Or was it actually something because of square?

You actually don't even need wifi or a cell plan to use square (only a tablet or some sort of device like it that can run the app) which is a great feature that not all (if any) other card readers have. If you are out of range of an internet connection, the payments will process as soon as you are back in range. (A little risky to do that way in case there's an issue with the card but you CAN do it--and if I had to do that, I would get the persons full name, address and phone number just in case I need to contact them about it).

I've personally never had an issue with square. :dunno The only issue I was seeing is with the new chip readers...you have to actually charge the battery on them and if they're not fully charged, or something, it won't register the card. So I (as well as Maggie) did have a hard time at BF charging some things to Maggie's phone with her chip thing but when that was the case I just switched over to my swipey thingie on her phone and it worked just fine.

Eleda
12-11-2016, 09:18 PM
Many people do not realize that the following all have the potential *not* to clear - to come up insufficient/no funds (*even* after a bank has credited funds - they will reverse *later* if it doesn't clear):

money orders from any source; cashier's checks; echecks; any form of payment other than cash.


This bears repeating over and over. I try to mention it every time Money Orders come into a conversation:
Money Orders are NOT the same as cash. As Mary said above, even if the Money Order is not fake, it can be CANCELED anytime within 30 days of purchase, even if it has already been CASHED or DEPOSITED. This is why supermarkets and places that are willing to cash paychecks are NOT willing to cash Money Orders. If canceled, your bank will deduct the amount from your account and you have no recourse. If big companies won't cash Money Orders, that should be a hint to small businesses and individuals.

I worked for one of those big companies for 20 years, and that knowledge is why we don't accept any MOs at Triple Mountain. Electronic payments protect both seller and buyer, as fraud protection is paid for by the fees we sellers pay to accept card payments.

unicornwoman
12-11-2016, 09:25 PM
Many years ago my bank recommended treating all Money Orders like personal checks. You wait until they clear. That is my policy and I state it as "My bank recommends it."

Mochi
12-12-2016, 12:42 AM
My bank holds money orders for a few days (Chase). They'll release some of it in advance if requested, but the money order itself has to clear.

So no, I don't think your policies are unreasonable at all. I actually find it fishy that someone would throw such a fit over it.

damaia
12-12-2016, 10:32 PM
I work for a bank. We get notices almost weekly that someone was caught passing either fake money orders or fake cashier's checks. They are NOT the same as cash and it's perfectly normal to wait for them to clear just like you would with a personal check.

idyourbreyer
12-14-2016, 09:12 PM
I don't think waiting on a postal money order is unreasonable. I used to treat those as cash and ship right away, but after hearing about your experience I would hold shipping, too. I rarely purchase anywhere but Breyer and eBay, so I'm a little less certain of references. Is asking for these on a non-trade or non-time payments transaction common? That's where I would probably get a little cranky, but I'm the first to admit that I'm a little out of touch with these things. Not sure what refs I could offer anyway, save for my eBay feedback rating.

Anyway, I second what others have said. You were up front with your requirements and were then uncomfortable with the transaction and said no. Nothing wrong here!

Janice

curlinfan
12-14-2016, 10:27 PM
If someone pays me with a USPS money order I take it to the post office along with the package. I tell the clerk to take the cost of mailing the package out of the money order & give me cash for the remainder. So if I have a USPS money order for $50 and it cost $10 to mail the box I get $40 in cash to put in my pocket. So, my question is, how does that come back on me several days later if it turns out the money order was fake. I have my $40 cash and the package has arrived at its destination. Wouldn't the post office just have to eat that loss? I don't see them tracking me down & demanding their $50 back. Wouldn't they be more concerned with who forged the money order? I've done it this way for years & never had a problem.

Mochi
12-15-2016, 12:24 AM
Postal orders and bank issued money orders are not quite the same thing.

Post offices will treat postal orders as cash, and some banks will release the funds immediately as well, but the same isn't true for bank issued money orders. Those usually are held until they clear. They're similar payment methods, but the way they're funded and processed is a bit different.

I don't see any problems with what you described, curlinfan. But that would only be possible with a postal order, and only if cashed immediately as you described. I think some businesses, like currency exchanges and even Walmarts, will cash bank issued money orders but I'm pretty sure you're held accountable if it is fraudulent - even if you're not the one it originated with.

curlinfan
12-15-2016, 09:39 AM
That's why I only take USPS money orders and cash them at the post office after I mail the package.

SylvanTrails
12-15-2016, 12:07 PM
If someone pays me with a USPS money order I take it to the post office along with the package. I tell the clerk to take the cost of mailing the package out of the money order & give me cash for the remainder. So if I have a USPS money order for $50 and it cost $10 to mail the box I get $40 in cash to put in my pocket. So, my question is, how does that come back on me several days later if it turns out the money order was fake. I have my $40 cash and the package has arrived at its destination. Wouldn't the post office just have to eat that loss? I don't see them tracking me down & demanding their $50 back. Wouldn't they be more concerned with who forged the money order? I've done it this way for years & never had a problem.

I guess I went to the PO at the wrong time of day or with too large a money order because last time I tried to do this...and I know the lady at the PO...she said they didn't have enough cash (I forget how much the MO was for at this point).

Mary
12-16-2016, 06:08 PM
Postal orders and bank issued money orders are not quite the same thing.

Post offices will treat postal orders as cash, and some banks will release the funds immediately as well, but the same isn't true for bank issued money orders. Those usually are held until they clear. They're similar payment methods, but the way they're funded and processed is a bit different.

I don't see any problems with what you described, curlinfan. But that would only be possible with a postal order, and only if cashed immediately as you described. I think some businesses, like currency exchanges and even Walmarts, will cash bank issued money orders but I'm pretty sure you're held accountable if it is fraudulent - even if you're not the one it originated with.

Good points all around.

The USPS has their own system for issuing money orders. Money orders issues in exchange for cash are not at risk.

Money orders, cashier's checks and any other instrument issued against a bank account balance is at risk. Even though it is done at the bank where the bank account resides.

Banks credit deposited funds for customers BEFORE those funds have cleared. Each bank has their own policies about how much they will credit and when. But this leaves the door open to certain kinds of manipulation, when someone deposits bad funds and then has a money order or cashier's check issued against that balance, before it bounces. The faster they can get someone else to give them goods in exchange for that bad cashier's check or money order, the more they can keep the goods and let someone else get the short end of the bad funds.

If you are the recipient of the money order or cashier's check and can get cash money for it, you're protected. But if instead you deposit it in your bank account, you are at risk in case it turns out not to be good later.

That is why some banks will accept certain kinds of instruments only as deposits, and will not cash them. They may credit funds right away to the bank account. To the customer that seems to be the same as receiving cash. But the bank is still in control and if the instrument bounces later, they will remove those funds.



That's why I only take USPS money orders and cash them at the post office after I mail the package.

Sounds like a good policy! :)