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Thread: My dad's creations

  1. #21
    Fiero, Khara, & Jazz Raiha's Avatar
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    Lovely work! It makes me think back to my grandfather who built me a custom "travel barn" about 23 years ago...its like a carrying case that opens up into a stall with a tack room.

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  2. #22
    Paid Participant papaone1's Avatar
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    100_0925.jpg100_0928.jpg100_0929.jpg100_0931.jpgOK you asked for more and here are some. For those of you starting to build on this hobby, here are a couple of observations. The traditionals are easier to make harness for because they are bigger and do not require the precision needed for the smaller ones. But they also cost more to start off, and of course they require more materials. The smaller models build about the same with a little more effort required, because of smaller size. I started with Collectas and shoe string and that works too. Just be patient and do what works for you. The harness' pictured are from the extremely talented artist , Tiki Kulp from Wi. Eleda thought this needs to be shared with the model horse world and I'm going to try.,,,,,,,,,,Loren

  3. #23

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    Those harnesses and wagons are really beautiful! Thanks for sharing your photos, papaone1

    Where do you find good reference photos? I don't know a thing about harness, but it would be good to understand how all those little bits go together.

  4. #24
    Paid Participant Salem's Avatar
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    This is a great thread! I'm so impressed, especially by all of the authentic little details. I clicked on the thread because I had wagons on my mind. I finally realized that the little covered wagon kit I assembled as a kid and have had on display in my living room all of these years is a lamp, duh - so I plugged it up the other night and found that it works great. No idea why I forgot all about it being a lamp and just folded the cord away inside, but I built the thing in the 70s, so who knows? When I look at it, I can't believe I did that when I was just twelve or thirteen. Then I see the awesome homemade art in this thread, and realize it wasn't so impressive at all! Thanks so much for posting, and I look forward to seeing more.
    "Some rise by sin, and some by virtue fall" - William Shakespeare

  5. #25

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    Welcome papaone1, and nice work!

  6. #26

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    Gorgeous wagons!

  7. #27

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    Wow!!!! Amazing!!!!
    Specializing in LSQ Model Horse Jumps, Props, and other Accessories!

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  8. #28
    under the oaks Mary's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by papaone1 View Post
    Attachment 151729Interesting question, A calash was usually a single seat forward facing and modeled like a Vis-a-Vis ( roughly translated "face to face") which was a two seat carriage. Some were covered, some had fold down tops. Usually the driver sat on a raised and uncovered high seat for better visibility. I suppose these are the horse drawn version of a yellow cab. A fully enclosed passenger with an exposed driver would be referred to as a brougham. A two wheeled version on this design was usually referred to as a barouche, and all served the same purpose, to get folks from where they were to where they needed to be. And I hope this helps. It is confusing because everyone has a different perspective and many were called names other than the correct ones, and then add the multi-national make up of the city and all of the nomenclature gets blurred.,,,,,,,,,,,,Loren
    Thank you, Loren, that is a great photo reference. The names of all the kinds of ... carts? carriages? that people used to get around in the day are not familiar enough to know what each is! I suspect they were a little bit like the car brands today - a Deville vs an F-150, for example.

    I have often wondered what the various designs were intended to accomplish. Better than walking, but the calash looks very exposed to the elements, even with the partial hood. I suppose the driver always seems to be out in the weather and because there wasn't another way for a driver to be able to see 360 degrees, see what the horses are doing and handle the reins, if there were a nice little driver's cab.

  9. #29
    Paid Participant papaone1's Avatar
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    I just type" horse harness" in google search and it will find many different images for you to see

  10. #30

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    All these photos are absolutely wonderful! Thanks for sharing!
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