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Thread: Wagon-on!

  1. #141
    Paid Participant Original Poster papaone1's Avatar
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    Here is an addition to the Troika, I still don't know what purpose it serves but now it has a Hoop as pictured in my research photos. One item that was mentioned was that in this type of hitch the horses could move at different gaits. The center horse could trot while the outer horse could canter, interesting. I used to have a team that performed like that, one had a bone jarring mile eating trot, while the other always used to canter to keep up and they were never together in strides.100_1368.jpg

  2. #142
    Greasons Seetings! Beethovens7th's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by papaone1 View Post
    Now to add an international flavor to the mix ,here is my version of a Russian Troika. Troika means 3 of them, 3 men , 3 horses, whatever. It is an open sled pulled by 3 horses and you had better dress warmly, cause this ride could get a mite chilly. The Russians don't wear those fur coats and hats just to be fashionable, while driving in Siberia in winter. Does any one know the reason for the hoop over the center horse in photos during research? I don' know if it has a purpose or is merely ornamental, so help me out if you can. ThanksAttachment 162225Attachment 162226Attachment 162227 I am going to try to smith a hoop tomorrow and if successful I'll add a photo, but I'm not , making any promises one way or the other.
    This is neat! Yeah, i know it is very chilly there and you need to dress warmly, but what of the horses? Do they work so hard pulling that they do not need blankets?

  3. #143
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    ^Something like a quarter sheet would be perfect, and not difficult to make! <3

    Thanks for sharing, papaone!
    This is one of my favorite pieces so far.

  4. #144
    Paid Participant Original Poster papaone1's Avatar
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    We can blanket the horses when they stop, if you were to blanket them while they are working they will overheat.

  5. #145
    Paid Participant Original Poster papaone1's Avatar
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    Eleda came to the rescue again in regards to the hoop. It is called a shaft bow and it takes the strain when starting a load, kind of like a spring or shock absorber. It is a common sight in the Baltic states and almost non existent in the US. Most are hand bent and tend to straighten out when not in use so the ends are tied together for storing.

  6. #146
    Paid Participant Original Poster papaone1's Avatar
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    Here is an earlier build of a 2 wheeled callash that I had hitched to a 100_1370.jpg 100_1371.jpg Collecta and now I've updated to a happy classic. I'm thinking he has found his place in life, and he is looking very pleased with himself.

  7. #147
    Greasons Seetings! Beethovens7th's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by papaone1 View Post
    Here is an earlier build of a 2 wheeled callash that I had hitched to a 100_1370.jpg 100_1371.jpg Collecta and now I've updated to a happy classic. I'm thinking he has found his place in life, and he is looking very pleased with himself.

    LOVE!
    i'm pleased with him, too, and his callash!

  8. #148
    Paid Participant Original Poster papaone1's Avatar
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    OK because we are getting ready for the winter snowfalls here is a beautiful pair of dapple grays hitched to t a 2 seat cutter. This was the way to get around in winter way back when horsepower came from actual horses. I can remember one of these when I was a boy and it sat and rotted away in grandpas granary. He said he and grandma used to go sparking in that cutter, what ever that was? Before my time for sure.100_1373.jpg100_1374.jpg100_1375.jpg OK can you just imagine riding in that cutter on a winter's eve, not too cold or windy , and 6 inches of new fallen powder snow. There is just some thing kind of wonderful about making the first set of tracks across the meadow, like the cover of a Christmas card or a page on the calendar. Can you just hear the sleigh bells ringing?

  9. #149

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    Thank you for posting all of these interesting vehicles! I like the buckskin hitched to the yellow cart.

  10. #150
    Greasons Seetings! Beethovens7th's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CcOxidase View Post
    Thank you for posting all of these interesting vehicles! I like the buckskin hitched to the yellow cart.
    IT looks sooo good on him!

  11. #151
    Paid Participant Original Poster papaone1's Avatar
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    Thanks to all for looking! Here is a horse drawn coal fired steam pumper engine fitted with a very fancy pair of Dapple gray Clydesdales. Contrary to popular belief these did not carry any water. The steam engine only drove the pump generating pressures of up to 350 psi. The next vehicle in line was usually a horse drawn water tanker or if you were lucky, to be near a stream or a river, because when the water was gone your pumper was done too. It was a far cry from the fire departments we all know today, but it was still better than the bucket brigade it replaced. Many early fire departments used a hand pumper usually with 6 or 8 men running the handles and they only got up to about 50 psi and like the steamer when the water ran out the pumper was done too. Be sure and thank your local fire dept. members for their service.100_1376.jpg100_1377.jpg100_1378.jpg

  12. #152
    Greasons Seetings! Beethovens7th's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by papaone1 View Post
    Thanks to all for looking! Here is a horse drawn coal fired steam pumper engine fitted with a very fancy pair of Dapple gray Clydesdales. Contrary to popular belief these did not carry any water. The steam engine only drove the pump generating pressures of up to 350 psi. The next vehicle in line was usually a horse drawn water tanker or if you were lucky, to be near a stream or a river, because when the water was gone your pumper was done too. It was a far cry from the fire departments we all know today, but it was still better than the bucket brigade it replaced. Many early fire departments used a hand pumper usually with 6 or 8 men running the handles and they only got up to about 50 psi and like the steamer when the water ran out the pumper was done too. Be sure and thank your local fire dept. members for their service.100_1376.jpg100_1377.jpg100_1378.jpg
    OOh This one's up Hubby's alley; certainly will have to show him!

  13. #153
    Paid Participant Original Poster papaone1's Avatar
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    OK It is almost fall and time to go for a buggy ride in the country to watch the leaves turn colors, and maybe stop at the farmer's market for some apples, and pears, and squashes. Here is a light buggy with room for 2 and a top to boot. It didn't take a lot of effort to move these buggies down the road and it was always a fun ride, just you and your best girl out on a Sunday afternoon in the crisp fall air. Gotta love that right?100_1379.jpg100_1380.jpg100_1381.jpg

  14. #154
    Paid Participant Original Poster papaone1's Avatar
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    Well while we are on the subject of buggies here is another. This one is a pony sized buggy and is being pulled by a POA. What is a POA you ask? Well a Pony of the Americas is an original breed developed in the good old USA and was and is one of the most popular and versatile breeds available. My first team was a pair of POAs named Babe and Appy, and I spent a lot of time holding the reins of that pretty and willing pair of mares. Good times.100_1382.jpg100_1383.jpg100_1384.jpg

  15. #155
    Paid Participant Original Poster papaone1's Avatar
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    This is a "Lost Soul" who was forwarded to me by a follower of my works . She told me he was a lonely little plastic horse with no one to care for him or play with him anymore, so she sent him to my Harnessry to be fitted with a harness and a vehicle so he could lead a productive and fulfilling life once more. And this is what happened next100_1388.jpg100_1387.jpg100_1386.jpg I fitted him with a new harness and a nice little run about gig. I'm thinking he looks quite proud to be up front of that and I'm sure he'll do very well there. Lots of miles left in that poor discarded and forgotten about "Lost Soul" from Hartland.

  16. #156
    Paid Participant Original Poster papaone1's Avatar
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    OK here is an offering to all you hitch lovers. This is a 4 up of Percheron mares hitched to a beer wagon. In the late 1880's Pabst brewery of Milwaukee , Wi. operated more than 20 multi team hitches delivering beer on a daily basis. This team has just returned from a successful Oktober Fest tour and has earned a much needed rest.100_1417.jpg100_1420.jpg100_1418.jpg

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